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tman's picture
5 pencils

Pantone to CMYK conversion

Was wondering what are the CMYK values for Pantone 805 C 2X?

Is there a free downlable program that can do this for me?

Thanks 2000 lbs in advance

Commenting on this Forum topic is closed.

natobasso's picture
3951 pencils

No free options I know of since Pantone color guides sell for quite a pretty penny. However, if you have Illustrator, Photoshop or InDesign you can easily do the conversion there:

I get: C-0% M-81% Y-51% K-0% for 805 Solid Coated (sort of a pinkish red)

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Powerpoint is not a design application

JimD's picture
2626 pencils

First, here's a brief article to help you out with how to do it yourself using Adobe's applications.

One option is Art Director's Toolkit, for $40 (kinda expensive, but does a lot)

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Visit The Graphic Mac for graphics and Mac OS tips, reviews, tutorials and discussion.

hence72's picture
3 pencils

This article made no sense to me at all. It implys that you already have the pantone colour on your screen and not just the number. Or maybe I read it wrong all ten times I tried

Gloria Chen's picture
121 pencils

You may go to Pantone website sign up for a free membership and then you can download a support PDF file with all Pantone to CYMK conversion values.

http://www.pantone.com/pages/pantone/pantone.aspx?ca=12&pg=19422

natobasso's picture
3951 pencils

Great resource! You should post this in the 'weblinks' section. I think all members of cb would like to have this info.

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Powerpoint is not a design application

ireid's picture
1283 pencils

But didn't find the 'support pdf file' you mentioned.

:(

"Try not, Do! or do not, there is no try."
-Yoda

hence72's picture
3 pencils

I couldnt find it either. try the zedimage link in the comment below

yahhoo's picture
2 pencils

i have the pdf if you want it.

yahhoo's picture
2 pencils

pantone.com's free pantone bridge chart contains errors....they state cmyk values and the corresponding swatch has different values....."thanks pantone"!! especially page 1,2,3......so if you just print it...dont assume its correct.
also the pantone bridge book was printed on a 12 color press...if you think you have a chance of even remotely matching the colors even with a 6 color inkjet....forget it...i should know....my printer is 44k......the best way is to print the chart and change the swatch values corresponding to what your printer actually prints to the "BRIDGE book".
I created a 70 page cmyk chart...increments of 5% 400 swatches per page!! 28000 swatches..
also the RGB chart from Illustartor 3200 swatches and corrected the 15 page pantone bridge chart to their own specs.....see the charts.... http://motionpicturesigns.com
printing the cmyk chart is the only way to quickly match a pantone color to what your printer actually prints...otherwise you are throwing a dart at the wall!...Mike S.

caoimghgin's picture
852 pencils

What does the 2X mean in 'Pantone 805 C 2X'?

Without my sense of direction, I don't know where I'd be.

caoimghgin's picture
852 pencils

and I would have found the answer. Means the ink is laid down twice for a richer color.

Without my sense of direction, I don't know where I'd be.

ImageMakerGraphics's picture
13 pencils

You see it used most with fluorescent inks as these inks, when laid down with just one pass, can lack some of the color "pop" that customers expect. With small areas of fluorescent ink you can get away with one pass and it will look pretty darn close to the Pantone book but if you print anything much larger than the swatch book, a "double bump" is the way to go.

Any PMS color with a large solid print area can benefit from enhanced color vibrancy and ink "smoothness" when using a double bump. You can also achieve cool effects within solid areas by leaving out some areas of the second pass creating a neat subtle two color design look.

ImageMakerGraphics

ImageMakerGraphics's picture
13 pencils

As long as you and your customers are aware, achieving ANY fluorescent ink reproduction in cmyk is NOT possible whatever Illustrator, Photoshop or InDesign says. Especially a "double bump" (2X) fluorescent! Special pigments are used in the inks that are just not reproducible in process color. This goes the same for Pantone 021, 032, 072, reflex blue, rubine red, and many other pms conversions.

If logo reproduction or company colors come into play, be sure that customers understand pms-to-cmyk conversions are far from perfect. A process color imaging guide is a small investment to be sure customers know what they will be getting and in the long run will save you $$.

Best Regards

ImageMakerGraphics

caoimghgin's picture
852 pencils

There is a certain value in getting a Pantone Process Guide, but since Pantone is publishing Lab values on their swatch books it appears even they are getting away from declairing C%M%Y%K% = PANTONE 805 and for very good reason.

The article that JimD points to is a little misleading because the author does not mention icc color profiles and the numbers that natobasso points are correct for magazine publications but not sheetfed.

Follow these steps to determine the best CMYK mix to match PANTONE.

1) Make a new file (a small one) in Photoshop in Lab mode.
2) Use the color picker to find and select the Pantone.
3) Fill your document with the color.
4) press shift-command-K, to bring up your color settings
5) Make sure you have Relative Colormetric setting.
6) Under 'Working Spaces' in CMYK choose 'U.S Web Coated (SWOP)v2' if going to a web press. If going sheetfed, choose 'GRACoL2006_Coated1v2' or 'SNAP 2007' if going to newsprint. You may have to locate and download the last two profiles, otherwise use what you're print shop suggests.
7) Use your eyedropper and info palette to see what the CMYK breakdown is.

Now, if your proofer is set to output files that match the profile you have chosen (and it's pretty accurate), you will have a good, if not exact color match. Better still, your numbers will be appropriate for that print method.

Also, be sure to set your color settings BACK to where they were, otherwise all of your RGB to CMYK conversions will be done with the new settings. That can spell a lot of trouble especially if your settings are for sheetfed but your files are going to newsprint!

Good luck and always be careful with your settings!

Without my sense of direction, I don't know where I'd be.

ImageMakerGraphics's picture
13 pencils

While there may be several best methods for converting PMS to Process, (and I would agree that if proper methods are followed you can exactly match SOME pms colors) ~ I would just like to re-state for the sake of rejected jobs and unhappy customers:

~ 805 C 2X (which is a double bump fluorescent ink) CAN NOT be reproduced in process ~ (BTW This also applies to all "metallic" inks PMS-871 through PMS-877 and all of the PMS-8000> these inks contain special pigments or actual metallic flakes that are just not found in cyan, magenta, yellow, or process black inks)

Sure, you can get in the color "neighborhood" ~maybe~ in a non-fluorescent sort of a pinkish red color look. But I would NEVER print a job with a client expecting a 2X 805 color and then delivering a process non-fluorescent "sort of a pinkish red" color job - They are bound to be unhappy.

The "process color imaging guide" is valuable in the fact that you can show the client a side-by-side comparison of the color in question, and then they can decide if they want to use that color.

And, at least in my Pantone imaging guide, they don't even show a 805 2X fluorescent to process conversion (my guess ~ because there is none).

Best Regards

ImageMakerGraphics

caoimghgin's picture
852 pencils

Certainly, fluorescent, metallic and out-of-gamut colors can only be approximated by 4C Process. It's good that you post this as a reminder. Any client who needs to use a process mix instead of the Pantone (wants to save money, Newprint or Magazine doesn't offer spot colors, etc.) would need to be warned well in advance that it's only an approximation and it could be a very poor one.

My only point was that one set of CMYK numbers for Pantone colors does not fit all print processes.

Cheers.

Without my sense of direction, I don't know where I'd be.

Anonymous's picture
hence72's picture
3 pencils

This is exactly what I needed thanks

Anonymous's picture

Zedimage.com 100 72 00 32
Photoshop, US Web SWOP Coated.icc 100 88 28 27
Photoshop, Coated FOGRA27 100 95 28 20
Photoshop, US Sheetfed Coated v2 100 84 40 16
Photoshop, SNAP 2007 75 65 21 31

*Photoshop conversions are Pantone Coated

Art D. Rector's picture
3166 pencils

You're headed for trouble imo. You need to get a Pantone/CMYK swatch book from somewhere and show the client the difference between the actual PMS color and the cmyk equivalent that they will be getting in the print job. PMS does not translate to cmyk very well in most instances. The PMS/CMYK book has the two colors printed side by side in order for you to compare what you want (PMS) to what you'll actually be getting (CMYK). Always check the two colors side by side and if there is any reasonable variance - get an approval from the client first. That's the easiest way to get a job rejected - show up with a color that is not even close.

Beyond that, I would always recommend you spec a job using whatever colors you are using in the final product - ie: Web jobs are sped'd in RGB, two color print jobs in whatever PMS colors you're using and CMYK jobs using a CMYK color model. This will cure most of these types of problems before they become problems.

natobasso's picture
3951 pencils

Agreed. CMYK and PMS almost always print differently - in fact you should just assume this because the process to create them is also different.

monkey1979's picture
680 pencils

PMS Coated -> CMYK
PMS Uncoated -> CMYK
Two of the most valuable books I have ever bought.

Coated and uncoated paper makes a massive difference too, always be aware of your end stock.

living on dreams and custard creams.

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