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Vootie's picture
1598 pencils

Adobe Broadens Creative Cloud Discount to Include Pirates

Adobe is still offering a discounted rate of $29.99 for the first year of Creative Cloud (regular $49.99) for registered users of CS3 apps or suites. But in the run-up to its Adobe MAX Creativity Conference in the first week of May, the firm seems to be relentlessly expanding its subscriber base. The latest initiative to boost the subscriber count is a limited-time offer that extends the $29.99 rate to anybody and everybody — no need to be a registered user of any Adobe product. The objective would seem to be to snag not only users of ancient versions of Adobe apps but those who have, for whatever reason, never used them. Or at least, never used a legal version. This offer is available until April 19.

Commenting on this Blog entry will be automatically closed on June 6, 2013.

thornysarus's picture
930 pencils

I've been a CC Subscriber for 4 months. I just called Adobe (800.585.0774) and they cancelled my previous subscription (at the full rate) and restarted my subscription (for a year from today) at the discounted rate.

Terrell Thornhill

e-zign Design Group

Vootie's picture
1598 pencils

Good news, pass it on.

YoungZM's picture
917 pencils

@thornysarus, nice- I wouldn't have called them crediting you.

The random sales makes me raise an eyebrow to my repeated questioning of the success of this business model. People still see the rental service and raise an eyebrow. Subscription based services are fine for movies because you may only watch it once, not for an expensive piece of software that you'll use daily. They include this rent to own, I'll jump on the bandwagon, but until Adobe starts selling licenses which you can eventually own, there's no need to upgrade for gimmicks. Hell, even a magazine you pay a fee for you get to own.

Vootie's picture
1598 pencils

Do you own the cell phone you use, or the network it runs on? I don't and it doesn't bother me. I also pay for such services as electricity and water. If I stop paying, they get cut off -- and yet I sleep at night. Creative Cloud is not for everyone and is not without its shortcomings, including having no exit strategy, which bothers both of us -- but it's here to stay.

YoungZM's picture
917 pencils

I don't think those are the greatest examples because no one really ever "owned" those commodities (save for cellphones or telecoms and those you have a choice in), they're utilities and not products. Though, if we want to push it, many people are actually starting to want to own things such as water filters, recycling runoff grids and solar panels so that they can be more efficient and less dependent on a system they have little control over. Adobe however is more product than service and unfortunately, have quite a stake in market share either through quality software built up over the years or very few competitors (Corel and Quark) with in some cases sub-standard products (Corel, imo. Quark is great but unfortunately combined with low market share, it doesn't house it's own suite).

Exit strategy probably exists to reverting, whether or nor that will happen I have little control in other than to become a statistic to evaluate. I agree with Art D. Aside from being a printer getting screwed by "progressive business", I don't see a huge amount of industry making such a leap for a few bells and whistles, or at least on a bulk basis (multi work stations). I could see the use to having a few office spaces with CC access for the highest level software and a few select program services for the seldom use you'd receive from them but it's just not business-sensible the way I look at it.

I don't think this would be such a negative thing if they still had purchasable licenses and the subscriptions worked you towards one in installments. I'd be on board that ship waiving the flag if that were the case.

Vootie's picture
1598 pencils

That idea has been suggested before and I agree that it would help a lot to reduce the fear factor. But how many months would it take before you paid the equivalent of the Master Collection?

>I don't think this would be such a negative thing if they still had purchasable licenses and the subscriptions worked you towards one in installments.<

Art D. Rector's picture
3165 pencils

So Adobe - again - slaps their installed base users in the face. They're basically saying "That $1500 you paid for Designer's Suite? Now it's only $29." Anyone who thinks Adobe is doing us a favor is either blind, crazy or - well... why bother going there again? It's the same old Adobe shuffle. Get you in - shake you down.

And sorry Vootie - I don't need the cell phone to stay in business. I can borrow someone else's phone. I can switch phones. I can switch providers. I can find a pay phone. I can drive over to the client and speak to them in person. There are a lot of options. I don't want Adobe to have control over my business because they're trying to expand their bottom line again.

Vootie's picture
1598 pencils

You are quite free to never take advantage of discounted offers for Creative Cloud. By all means mutter darkly about Adobe taking advantage of its customers but that really isn't going to change anything. The train is leaving the station but of course you don't need to be on it -- it's a personal choice whether to remain competitive as a provider of design and development services or not. Either way, Adobe ALREADY has control over your business, like it or not, that's what happened when we all embraced their apps and allowed them to become the dominant force in design and publishing applications, so it's a bit late now to become concerned about it -- Creative Cloud really doesn't change much. Why shoot the messenger?

YoungZM's picture
917 pencils

That's the rub though, buying these new licenses and services hasn't increased anyones ability to remain competitive except for print companies to keep up with people who like the flashy new thing. Adobe hasn't really added anything of serious design value for quite a few suites now. They're running out of items they can add that will drastically help or change the way we work. Frankly most of the core mechanics were worked out in Photoshop 6 and 7 and then improved upon greatly (imo) in CS2 and 3, the rest are just extensions, elaborations and addons to the core program that don't actually heavily influence commercial design.

This is where I feel it fails. The intended original market is losing on this because you have businesses that would upgrade their creative suites every 3-5 years to keep up with the printers and it would be cost-effective by comparison (at regular published price, not sale).

Yes we gave Adobe decent market control and share, they deserved it at the time. Remember though that they also bought their way into the market as well through other company acquisitions and patents. Adobe is turning into a great business, not a great product. Look at the acquisition of Macromedia if you must. Flash and Dreamweaver were dying relics of the 90s, Adobe has dragged them along kicking and screaming at a sub-standard rate and started inserting them into core software for gimmicky features that no one truly appreciates anyways. No self respecting web designer codes with Dreamweaver because of the huge amount of legacy code and unneeded clutter and with HTML5, it's rare to see flash.

Vootie's picture
1598 pencils

It's true that Dreamweaver has been slumbering for some now. Have you tried any of the new HTML-based tools Adobe has created? Muse, for example, or the Edge tools that are available in the free Creative Cloud subscription?

YoungZM's picture
917 pencils

Yes and relatively speaking unless you hand-code you're adding in needless lines that a program thinks you need. They're great tools to "get you started" but you still have to go back through everything and essentially proof read so that it's multi-browser compatible. It makes me sad but so long as the limitations are understood that's just a good baseline to start. Muse is a very close relative of DW.

Personally speaking I use Komodo edit, it's essentially a high powered, glorified Notepad that highlights and recognizes code and just makes it easier to write and view. There's plenty of other software just like it for free however- that's just what I ended up finding and accepting as "neat" when I first did my search long ago.

Art D. Rector's picture
3165 pencils

Vootie - seriously - how am I "shooting the messenger" by pointing out the flaws in Adobe's plan? If you're confused - I'm sure you can see why we might be confused too.

And sorry - Adobe doesn't control my business or my career. I make sure of that by not buying into things of this nature where they would gain more control than would be prudent.

Vootie's picture
1598 pencils

I'm not confused about Creative Cloud and I would guess neither are the almost half a million paid subscribers. No need to join the party.

Art D. Rector's picture
3165 pencils

"No need to join the party."

Exactly. Now you're catching on. ;-)

qwertyale's picture
2048 pencils

probably Apple will bring soon some good surprise for haters like me and Art D.

yes I'm brazilian xD

LutherP's picture
1 pencil

Nice post to know.Every now and again, a “rent-or-buy” comparison will come out on a business news website. Many of them are mendacious if not outright propaganda, as most leave out a ton of data and hidden fees of homeownership. However, Zillow, oddly enough, has actually come up with one that is near to reality. Article resource:
https://personalmoneynetwork.com/

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